Month: September 2018

2018 – Environment: #Unplastic

Jamaica bans plastic etc

Why Global Citizens Should Care

==============================
As the world’s oceans fill up with plastic, countries around the world are taking action to restrict plastic pollution. You can join us in taking action on this issue here.
==============================

ENVIRONMENT:
Jamaica Announces Plan to Ban Styrofoam, Plastic Bags, and Plastic Straws

Jamaica announced it will ban styrofoam, single-use plastic bags, and single-use plastic straws starting Jan. 1, 2019, according to the Jamaica Gleaner.

The island nation is also embarking on a campaign to reduce how much plastic enters marine environments. Plastic pollution has become a major concern in Jamaica, and this new announcement builds on earlier efforts to improve recycling programs.

The government will also be encouraging citizens to reduce their plastic use by, among other things, buying tote bags.

Take Action: Take the Plastic Pledge: #UnplasticthePlanet

“We’re moving towards a ban on single-use plastic, but while we do so, we’re also working on a Plastic Minimisation Project in collaboration with United Nations Environment, and with the support of the Government of Japan, to reduce and manage plastic marine litter from the land-based activities, in an environmentally sound matter,” Daryl Vaz, a member of the Jamaica’s ministry of economic growth and job creation, told the Jamaica Observer.

The country’s National Environment and Planning Agency is still crafting particular aspects of the law, including various exemptions that will be phased in up until 2021, according to the Jamaica Gleaner.

For example, disability-based exemptions for plastic straws will be allowed. As the world has rushed to ban single-use plastic straws, people with disabilities who rely on straws have not always been consulted.

Read More: There’s a Problem With Outright Banning Plastic Straws

Certain food items such as meat will still be allowed to be packaged with styrofoam, and plastic bags will be allowed in certain cases to guarantee public health and food safety standards, according to the Jamaica Gleaner.

The ambitious ban puts Jamaica at the forefront of plastic restrictions around the world, ahead of pioneering countries like Taiwan, but in the years ahead it’s likely that similar bans will become the global norm. In recent years, more than 60 countries have taken action against plastic production in response to growing awareness of a crisis levels of environmental pollution.

More than 380 million tons of plasticare produced each year and the vast majority of this material is thrown away, never to be recycled. A lot of this plastic, up to 13 million tons per year, makes it into the world’s oceans where it causes great harm to marine life.

A UN report found that up to 5 trillion plastic bags are used each year, which, if tied together, would span the planet seven times every hour.

Read More: Why Global Citizen Is Campaigning to Reduce Plastic Waste in the Oceans

Further, a 2014 study estimated that 5.25 trillion pieces of microplastic are in marine environments. By 2050, ocean plastic could outweigh fish. These microplastics are so pervasive that humans actually eat around 70,000 microplastic fibers every year.

When Jamaica’s new law goes into effect by 2019, millions of more tons of plastic will have made it into the world’s oceans. By then, hopefully, plastic production will have peaked.

!2018 – 5 Cancer Causing Foods_1

reTwogger: 180925tko.

!2018 – Top 5 Cancer Causing Foods_1


Understanding possible causes of cancer comes down to understanding the causes of gene and DNA mutations.

Chemicals (like carcinogens), radiation, obesity, hormones, chronic inflammation, smoking, viruses, and a number of other factors have been found to be cancer causing. With the primary causes for cancer being chemicals and radiation, both these factors can be greatly reduced through the food and lifestyle choices that you make. Here are 5 cancer causing foods to avoid to cut your cancer risk in half:

1. GMOs (Genetically Modified Foods):

The rapidly growing industry of genetically modified crops are infiltrating our food supply at an alarming rate. More than 90% of our corn and soy are now genetically modified. This fairly new practice is the source of many debates. Experts agree that adequate testing was not done before GMO foods were added to the ingredient listing of thousands of products.
In other words, no one – including the growers and manufacturers of GMO foods – knows the long-term effect they will have on human health. Look for GMO-free labels whenever possible or buy organic (which always means a product is not genetically modified).

2. Microwave Popcorn


From the chemically-lined bag to the actual contents, microwave popcorn is at the center of lung cancer debates around the world.
Not only are the kernels and oil likely GMO (which the manufacturer does not have to disclose) unless organic, the fumes released from artificial butter flavoring contain diacetyl, which is toxic to humans. Make your own organic popcorn the old-fashioned way – it tastes better, doesn’t release toxic fumes, and is a healthier choice for you.

3. Refined Sugar

The biggest cancer causing food (by far) is high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and other refined sugars. Even brown sugar is highly refined white sugar with some of the removed molasses added back in for flavor and color. Refined sugars (and foods made with them) are the source of major insulin spikes and feed the growth of cancer cells.
Since the majority of the sugar supply in the U.S. is made using genetically modified (GMO) sugar beets, a healthier option is organic honey, coconut sugar, or maple sugar. Now that oncologists are using diabetes medication to fight cancer cells, there’s no doubt (finally) that those mutated cancer cells love sugar.

4. Salted, Pickled, And Smoked Foods


These products typically contain preservatives, such as nitrates, which are intended to prolong shelf life. The additives used in processed foods can accumulate in your body over time.
Eventually, such toxins cause damage at the cellular level and lead to diseases like cancer. When smoked foods are cooked at high temperatures, the nitrates are converted to the much more dangerous nitrites. (Note: By pickled foods we don’t mean the fermented foods you make at home.)

5. White Flour


When flour is refined, all nutritional value is removed. Then it’s bleached with chlorine gas to make it more appealing to consumers. The glycemic index for white flour is very high – meaning it spikes your insulin levels without providing nutritional fuel.

Carbohydrates are converted to sugars by your body, so excessive products that contain white flour can lead to increased insulin resistance. Simple sugars (like refined carbohydrates) are the preferred fuel source for cancer.

//———-reTwogger: 180925tko———-

fast comeback dot com

2018 – Environment:

#UnplasticthePlanet:

reTwogger: 180922tko

ENVIRONMENT:
Jamaica Announces Plan to Ban Styrofoam, Plastic Bags, and Plastic Straws

Why Global Citizens Should Care
==============================
As the world’s oceans fill up with plastic, countries around the world are taking action to restrict plastic pollution. You can join us in taking action on this issue here.
==============================

Jamaica announced it will ban styrofoam, single-use plastic bags, and single-use plastic straws starting Jan. 1, 2019, according to the Jamaica Gleaner.

The island nation is also embarking on a campaign to reduce how much plastic enters marine environments. Plastic pollution has become a major concern in Jamaica, and this new announcement builds on earlier efforts to improve recycling programs.

The government will also be encouraging citizens to reduce their plastic use by, among other things, buying tote bags.

Take Action: Take the Plastic Pledge: #UnplasticthePlanet

“We’re moving towards a ban on single-use plastic, but while we do so, we’re also working on a Plastic Minimisation Project in collaboration with United Nations Environment, and with the support of the Government of Japan, to reduce and manage plastic marine litter from the land-based activities, in an environmentally sound matter,” Daryl Vaz, a member of the Jamaica’s ministry of economic growth and job creation, told the Jamaica Observer.

The country’s National Environment and Planning Agency is still crafting particular aspects of the law, including various exemptions that will be phased in up until 2021, according to the Jamaica Gleaner.

For example, disability-based exemptions for plastic straws will be allowed. As the world has rushed to ban single-use plastic straws, people with disabilities who rely on straws have not always been consulted.

Read More: There’s a Problem With Outright Banning Plastic Straws

Certain food items such as meat will still be allowed to be packaged with styrofoam, and plastic bags will be allowed in certain cases to guarantee public health and food safety standards, according to the Jamaica Gleaner.

The ambitious ban puts Jamaica at the forefront of plastic restrictions around the world, ahead of pioneering countries like Taiwan, but in the years ahead it’s likely that similar bans will become the global norm. In recent years, more than 60 countries have taken action against plastic production in response to growing awareness of a crisis levels of environmental pollution.

More than 380 million tons of plasticare produced each year and the vast majority of this material is thrown away, never to be recycled. A lot of this plastic, up to 13 million tons per year, makes it into the world’s oceans where it causes great harm to marine life.

A UN report found that up to 5 trillion plastic bags are used each year, which, if tied together, would span the planet seven times every hour.

Read More: Why Global Citizen Is Campaigning to Reduce Plastic Waste in the Oceans

Further, a 2014 study estimated that 5.25 trillion pieces of microplastic are in marine environments. By 2050, ocean plastic could outweigh fish. These microplastics are so pervasive that humans actually eat around 70,000 microplastic fibers every year.

When Jamaica’s new law goes into effect by 2019, millions of more tons of plastic will have made it into the world’s oceans. By then, hopefully, plastic production will have peaked.

//———-reTwogger: 180922tko———-

Plastic Pollution Coalition is a growing global alliance of individuals, organizations, businesses, and policymakers working toward a world free of plastic pollution and its toxic impacts on humans, animals, waterways and oceans, and the environment.

!2018 – Zumba Your Way – Songs_1

reTwogger: 180918tko.

Do it your own way

Once you think you’ve mastered the basics, don’t feel like you have to stick to the videos. Find a good, inspiring and body-moving playlist and try it on your own. Try songs like this to get you started.

Pick the ones that make you want to move the most and get to shakin’ those Labamba  hips!

Originally published December 2015. Updated July 2017.

//———-reTwogger: 180918tko.———-

!2018 – PMP Ch 9 – Communications Management Questions (Rita Ch 10)

reBlogger: 180904tko

30 Qtns:

Q29. If a project manager wants to report on the actual project results vs. planned results, she should use a:


A. Trend report
B. Forecasting report
C. Status report
D. Variance report

Answer D

This situation describes the need to “compare,” A trend report (choice A) shows performance over time. A forecasting report (choice B) looks only to the future. A status report (choice C) is generally static (relating to a moment in time). The only choice that compares project results is a variance analysis (choice D).

30. A particular stakeholder has a reputation for making many changes on projects. What is the BEST approach a project manager can take at the beginning of the project to manage this situation?

A. Say “No” to the stakeholder a few times to dissuade him from submitting more changes
B. Get the stakeholder involved in the project as early as possible
C. Talk to the stakeholder’s boss to find ways to direct the stakeholder’s activities to another project
D. Ask that the stakeholder not be included in the stakeholder listing

Answer B

We cannot avoid the stakeholder (choices C and D), because he has a stake in the project. A project manager can say “No”‘ (choice A), but this does not solve the root cause. There may be some good ideas within those changes. The only choice that deals with the problem is choice B. Changes are not bad! Changes normally come from lack of input at the beginning of the project.
If we begin effective communication with this stakeholder early (choice B), we stand a much better chance of discovering his changes during the planning process, when they will have less of an impact on the project.