EyeHealthCare

2015 – Take Care of Your Eyes_5.4

2 parts:

1. Ophthalmology (/ˌɒfθɑːlˈmɑːlədʒi/ or /ˌɒpθɑːlˈmɒlədʒi/)[1] is the branch of medicine that deals with the anatomy, physiology and diseases of the eye.[2] An ophthalmologist is a specialist in medical and surgical eye problems. Since ophthalmologists perform operations on eyes, they are both surgical and medical specialists. A multitude of diseases and conditions can be diagnosed from the eye.[3]

2. WHEN SHOULD YOU SEE AN OPHTHALMOLOGIST?
It is important to treat our eyes with care throughout our lives.  Ignoring changes in vision or skipping eye examinations puts our most precious faculty at risk.

The Canadian Ophthalmological Society (COS) recommends that adults see an ophthalmologist as soon as possible if you experience any of the following symptoms:

Loss of vision or decreased vision in one or both eyes
Changes in vision such as sudden spots, flashes of light, lightning streaks or jagged lines of light, wavy or watery vision, blurry faces, distortions or wavy lines, haloes around lights, double vision
Changes in the field of vision such as shadows, curtain-like loss of vision, black spots or blurriness in central or peripheral (side) vision
Physical changes to the eye such as crossed eyes, eyes that turn in, out, up or down, pain, signs of infection (redness, swelling, discharge, etc.)
Changes in colour vision
How often should you have your eyes examined?
Having your eyes examined periodically throughout your life and giving a family history of any eye disease is important.

An initial eye exam at six months old helps with early detection of vision problems that can contribute to developmental delays, educational setbacks and behavioural problems in children having difficulty seeing properly.

Healthy adults who do not notice anything wrong with their eyes should see an eye doctor according to this schedule:

Age 19 to 40: at least every 10 years

Age 41 to 55: at least every 5 years

Age 56 to 65: at least every 3 years

Over age 65: at least every 2 years

Are some Canadians at a higher risk of eye problems and need to see an eye doctor more frequently?
Yes.  Canadians at a higher risk include:

People with diabetes, thyroid disease, rheumatological diseases such as lupus.
People of African or Hispanic descent
Anyone with a tendency toward high intraocular pressure
Anyone with a family history of glaucoma, cataract, macular degeneration, or retinal detachment
Anyone with a previous eye injury
People taking certain medications (Plaquanil, Prednisone, Ethambutol are just a few of the medications that can affect the eyes — always ask your prescribing physician if vision can be affected by the meds you take)
People already experiencing poor eyesight from any other causes such as cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, etc.
These people should see an eye doctor according to this schedule:

Over age 40: at least every 3 years

Over age 50: at least every 2 years

Over age 60: at least once a year

What’s the difference between a diagnostic eye exam and an exam for the purposes of refraction?
A diagnostic eye examination requires knowledge and experience provided by a medical doctor with specialty certification in ophthalmology

A refractive examination involves the taking of measurements for visual acuity and the prescribing of correction. This examination does not require a medical doctor.

The use of supporting vision team personnel to perform certain non-medical procedures or tests is appropriate as a means of increasing the availability of ophthalmologists to provide medical services, and to provide comprehensive and efficient eye care to the greatest number of people.

Supporting personnel on the vision team work with and are supervised by ophthalmologists at all times. The ophthalmologist is responsible for the delivery of comprehensive eye care, which includes primary, secondary or tertiary care.
——————-more syuff—————–

How to Choose the Right Eye Doctor
By Gary Heiting, OD

On this page: What is an optometrist? • What is an ophthalmologist? • What is an optician? • Which eye doctor should I see? • Vision insurance and your choice of eye doctor

Choosing an eye doctor is an important health care decision. After all, you will be trusting your eye doctor to safeguard your precious sense of sight and help you maintain a lifetime of good vision.

The first step in your decision is to understand that there are two types of eye doctors: optometrists and ophthalmologists. It’s also helpful to understand the third “O” in eye care: opticians.

What Is an Optometrist?

An optometrist is an eye doctor who has earned the Doctor of Optometry (OD) degree. Optometrists examine eyes for both vision and health problems, and correct refractive errors by prescribing eyeglasses and contact lenses. Some optometrists also provide low vision care and vision therapy.

Learn how Optometry Giving Sight helps 670 million people to see again
Save $50 on Crizal® and Transitions® lenses with the BenefitsPal™ card

Optometrists in the United States also are licensed to prescribe medications to treat certain eye problems and diseases. The scope of medical care that can be provided by optometrists is determined by state law. (For details about the scope of practice of optometrists where you live, visit the website of your state’s board of optometry.)

Both optometrists and ophthalmologists examine eyes and prescribe eyeglasses and contact lenses. (Image: American Academy of Ophthalmology)
Optometrists also may participate in your pre- and post-operative care if you have eye surgery performed by an ophthalmologist. With a few exceptions, optometrists in the U.S. are not trained or licensed to perform eye surgery.

An optometrist generally must complete a four-year college degree program in the sciences, plus four years of post-graduate professional training in optometry school. In this regard, the educational requirements of an optometrist are similar to those of a dentist.

Like ophthalmologists, optometrists are required to fulfill continuing education requirements on an ongoing basis to maintain their licensure and stay current with the latest standards of eye care.

What Is an Ophthalmologist?

An ophthalmologist is a medical doctor (MD) or an osteopathic doctor (DO) who specializes in eye and vision care. Ophthalmologists are trained to perform eye exams, diagnose and treat disease, prescribe medications and perform eye surgery. They also write prescriptions for eyeglasses and contact lenses.

Ophthalmologists generally complete four years of college, four years of medical school, one year of internship, and a minimum of three years of hospital-based residency in ophthalmology.

So (to extend the analogy with dentistry), whereas the education of an optometrist is similar to that of a general dentist, the education and training of an ophthalmologist are more similar to that of an oral surgeon.

What Is an Optician?

An optician is not an eye doctor, but opticians are an important part of your eye care team. Opticians use prescriptions written by an optometrist or an ophthalmologist to fit and sell eyeglasses, contact lenses and other eyewear.

In some states, opticians must complete an opticianry training program and be licensed. Other states don’t require opticians to obtain formal training or licensure. Some states also allow opticians to fit contact lenses, usually after completing a certification program.

Which Eye Doctor Should I See: An Optometrist or an Ophthalmologist?

If your eyes are healthy and don’t require specialized medical or surgical treatment, the type of eye doctor you choose for a routine eye exam is a matter of personal preference.

Optometrists and ophthalmologists both perform routine eye exams and both types of eye doctors are trained to detect, diagnose and manage eye diseases that require medical and non-medical treatment.

If you already have a medical eye problem — such as glaucoma, macular degeneration or cataracts — it is important to seek care from an eye doctor who is highly trained and skilled in monitoring and treating your condition. In many cases, this may mean that medical or surgical eye care by a specially trained ophthalmologist is in order. In such cases, your optometrist (or general ophthalmologist) may refer you to a colleague who is a specialist in treating your condition.

Most optometrists are capable of medically treating common eye problems (such as dry eyes and eye infections) and certain chronic eye diseases (such as glaucoma) without the assistance of an ophthalmologist. But only ophthalmologists can provide the entire scope of treatment options, including eye surgery, for both minor and complex eye disorders.

Ophthalmologists are medical eye doctors who are licensed to perform eye surgery.
Another option for the care of chronic eye health problems is called co-management. In co-management, your primary care eye doctor (usually an optometrist) refers you to a specialist (usually an ophthalmologist) for a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan for your eye problem. The ophthalmologist may choose to manage the problem medically or perform eye surgery or both.

After the condition is controlled or surgically treated, the specialist then sends you back to your primary care eye doctor, who continues to monitor and treat your condition or perform your post-operative care based on the specialist’s recommendations.

Co-management is a particularly good solution if you are very pleased with the quality of eye care you are receiving from your primary care eye doctor, but you want to have any specific medical eye conditions treated by an experienced specialist.

Vision Insurance and Your Choice of Eye Doctor

If you have vision insurance or a health insurance policy that covers eye care, one factor in choosing an eye doctor is determining if he or she is an authorized provider under your insurance plan, and what your out-of-pocket expense will be for the exam.

7 bad habits that are aging your eyes!What exactly is “surfer’s eye”?
Other Factors When Choosing an Eye Doctor

When inquiring about the services an eye doctor provides, ask what happens if a problem is detected that requires treatment beyond the doctor’s scope of care. Which medical an2 parts:

1. Ophthalmology (/ˌɒfθɑːlˈmɑːlədʒi/ or /ˌɒpθɑːlˈmɒlədʒi/)[1] is the branch of medicine that deals with the anatomy, physiology and diseases of the eye.[2] An ophthalmologist is a specialist in medical and surgical eye problems. Since ophthalmologists perform operations on eyes, they are both surgical and medical specialists. A multitude of diseases and conditions can be diagnosed from the eye.[3]

2. WHEN SHOULD YOU SEE AN OPHTHALMOLOGIST?
It is important to treat our eyes with care throughout our lives.  Ignoring changes in vision or skipping eye examinations puts our most precious faculty at risk.

The Canadian Ophthalmological Society (COS) recommends that adults see an ophthalmologist as soon as possible if you experience any of the following symptoms:

Loss of vision or decreased vision in one or both eyes
Changes in vision such as sudden spots, flashes of light, lightning streaks or jagged lines of light, wavy or watery vision, blurry faces, distortions or wavy lines, haloes around lights, double vision
Changes in the field of vision such as shadows, curtain-like loss of vision, black spots or blurriness in central or peripheral (side) vision
Physical changes to the eye such as crossed eyes, eyes that turn in, out, up or down, pain, signs of infection (redness, swelling, discharge, etc.)
Changes in colour vision
How often should you have your eyes examined?
Having your eyes examined periodically throughout your life and giving a family history of any eye disease is important.

An initial eye exam at six months old helps with early detection of vision problems that can contribute to developmental delays, educational setbacks and behavioural problems in children having difficulty seeing properly.

Healthy adults who do not notice anything wrong with their eyes should see an eye doctor according to this schedule:

Age 19 to 40: at least every 10 years

Age 41 to 55: at least every 5 years

Age 56 to 65: at least every 3 years

Over age 65: at least every 2 years

Are some Canadians at a higher risk of eye problems and need to see an eye doctor more frequently?
Yes.  Canadians at a higher risk include:

People with diabetes, thyroid disease, rheumatological diseases such as lupus.
People of African or Hispanic descent
Anyone with a tendency toward high intraocular pressure
Anyone with a family history of glaucoma, cataract, macular degeneration, or retinal detachment
Anyone with a previous eye injury
People taking certain medications (Plaquanil, Prednisone, Ethambutol are just a few of the medications that can affect the eyes — always ask your prescribing physician if vision can be affected by the meds you take)
People already experiencing poor eyesight from any other causes such as cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, etc.
These people should see an eye doctor according to this schedule:

Over age 40: at least every 3 years

Over age 50: at least every 2 years

Over age 60: at least once a year

What’s the difference between a diagnostic eye exam and an exam for the purposes of refraction?
A diagnostic eye examination requires knowledge and experience provided by a medical doctor with specialty certification in ophthalmology

A refractive examination involves the taking of measurements for visual acuity and the prescribing of correction. This examination does not require a medical doctor.

The use of supporting vision team personnel to perform certain non-medical procedures or tests is appropriate as a means of increasing the availability of ophthalmologists to provide medical services, and to provide comprehensive and efficient eye care to the greatest number of people.

Supporting personnel on the vision team work with and are supervised by ophthalmologists at all times. The ophthalmologist is responsible for the delivery of comprehensive eye care, which includes primary, secondary or tertiary care.
——————-more syuff—————–

How to Choose the Right Eye Doctor
By Gary Heiting, OD

On this page: What is an optometrist? • What is an ophthalmologist? • What is an optician? • Which eye doctor should I see? • Vision insurance and your choice of eye doctor

Choosing an eye doctor is an important health care decision. After all, you will be trusting your eye doctor to safeguard your precious sense of sight and help you maintain a lifetime of good vision.

The first step in your decision is to understand that there are two types of eye doctors: optometrists and ophthalmologists. It’s also helpful to understand the third “O” in eye care: opticians.

What Is an Optometrist?

An optometrist is an eye doctor who has earned the Doctor of Optometry (OD) degree. Optometrists examine eyes for both vision and health problems, and correct refractive errors by prescribing eyeglasses and contact lenses. Some optometrists also provide low vision care and vision therapy.

Learn how Optometry Giving Sight helps 670 million people to see again
Save $50 on Crizal® and Transitions® lenses with the BenefitsPal™ card

Optometrists in the United States also are licensed to prescribe medications to treat certain eye problems and diseases. The scope of medical care that can be provided by optometrists is determined by state law. (For details about the scope of practice of optometrists where you live, visit the website of your state’s board of optometry.)

Both optometrists and ophthalmologists examine eyes and prescribe eyeglasses and contact lenses. (Image: American Academy of Ophthalmology)
Optometrists also may participate in your pre- and post-operative care if you have eye surgery performed by an ophthalmologist. With a few exceptions, optometrists in the U.S. are not trained or licensed to perform eye surgery.

An optometrist generally must complete a four-year college degree program in the sciences, plus four years of post-graduate professional training in optometry school. In this regard, the educational requirements of an optometrist are similar to those of a dentist.

Like ophthalmologists, optometrists are required to fulfill continuing education requirements on an ongoing basis to maintain their licensure and stay current with the latest standards of eye care.

What Is an Ophthalmologist?

An ophthalmologist is a medical doctor (MD) or an osteopathic doctor (DO) who specializes in eye and vision care. Ophthalmologists are trained to perform eye exams, diagnose and treat disease, prescribe medications and perform eye surgery. They also write prescriptions for eyeglasses and contact lenses.

Ophthalmologists generally complete four years of college, four years of medical school, one year of internship, and a minimum of three years of hospital-based residency in ophthalmology.

So (to extend the analogy with dentistry), whereas the education of an optometrist is similar to that of a general dentist, the education and training of an ophthalmologist are more similar to that of an oral surgeon.

What Is an Optician?

An optician is not an eye doctor, but opticians are an important part of your eye care team. Opticians use prescriptions written by an optometrist or an ophthalmologist to fit and sell eyeglasses, contact lenses and other eyewear.

In some states, opticians must complete an opticianry training program and be licensed. Other states don’t require opticians to obtain formal training or licensure. Some states also allow opticians to fit contact lenses, usually after completing a certification program.

Which Eye Doctor Should I See: An Optometrist or an Ophthalmologist?

If your eyes are healthy and don’t require specialized medical or surgical treatment, the type of eye doctor you choose for a routine eye exam is a matter of personal preference.

Optometrists and ophthalmologists both perform routine eye exams and both types of eye doctors are trained to detect, diagnose and manage eye diseases that require medical and non-medical treatment.

If you already have a medical eye problem — such as glaucoma, macular degeneration or cataracts — it is important to seek care from an eye doctor who is highly trained and skilled in monitoring and treating your condition. In many cases, this may mean that medical or surgical eye care by a specially trained ophthalmologist is in order. In such cases, your optometrist (or general ophthalmologist) may refer you to a colleague who is a specialist in treating your condition.

Most optometrists are capable of medically treating common eye problems (such as dry eyes and eye infections) and certain chronic eye diseases (such as glaucoma) without the assistance of an ophthalmologist. But only ophthalmologists can provide the entire scope of treatment options, including eye surgery, for both minor and complex eye disorders.

Ophthalmologists are medical eye doctors who are licensed to perform eye surgery.
Another option for the care of chronic eye health problems is called co-management. In co-management, your primary care eye doctor (usually an optometrist) refers you to a specialist (usually an ophthalmologist) for a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan for your eye problem. The ophthalmologist may choose to manage the problem medically or perform eye surgery or both.

After the condition is controlled or surgically treated, the specialist then sends you back to your primary care eye doctor, who continues to monitor and treat your condition or perform your post-operative care based on the specialist’s recommendations.

Co-management is a particularly good solution if you are very pleased with the quality of eye care you are receiving from your primary care eye doctor, but you want to have any specific medical eye conditions treated by an experienced specialist.

Vision Insurance and Your Choice of Eye Doctor

If you have vision insurance or a health insurance policy that covers eye care, one factor in choosing an eye doctor is determining if he or she is an authorized provider under your insurance plan, and what your out-of-pocket expense will be for the exam.

7 bad habits that are aging your eyes!What exactly is “surfer’s eye”?
Other Factors When Choosing an Eye Doctor

When inquiring about the services an eye doctor provides, ask what happens if a problem is detected that requires treatment beyond the doctor’s scope of care. Which medical and surgical specialists do they refer to, and where are they located?

[Page updated February 2014]d surgical specialists do they refer to, and where are they located?

[Page updated February 2014]

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